$99.99

14 CEs
CEU Course

2-Day Intensive Workshop: Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT for PTSD) (May 2023)

Register Now

Cognitive Behavior Institute is excited to welcome Christina DiChiara, Psy.D., for a live interactive webinar on: Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT for PTSD)

Date

05/01/2023 9:00AM - 5:00PM EST

05/02/2023 9:00AM - 5:00PM EST

Cost

$99.99

Credit Hours

14 clinical CEs

Course Overview

Cognitive Behavior Institute is excited to welcome Christina DiChiara, Psy.D., for a live interactive webinar on: Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT for PTSD)

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will define what CPT is as an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral therapy for addressing the symptoms of PTSD.
  • Participants will summarize the diagnosis of PTSD.
  • Participants will distinguish CPT as an evidence-based treatment.
  • Participants will summarize how the existing literature on CPT has informed the current CPT protocol.
  • Participants will summarize cognitive theory for PTSD terms, including assimilation, over-accommodation, and accommodation.
  • Participants will identify the general overview of the CPT protocol.
  • Participants will describe the rationale for CPT.
  • Participants will describe key concepts of CPT, such as natural vs manufactured emotions, the “just world” belief, assimilation, over-accommodation and accommodation.
  • Participants will define stuck points.
  • Participants will identify stuck points as different from facts, feeling statements, and moral statements.
  • Participants will describe the cognitive therapy methods used in CPT.
  • Participants will describe the goal of a trauma account in CPT.
  • Participants will recall the 5 theme modules of CPT.
  • Participants will recognize the individual exercises in CPT associated with each theme module.
  • Participants will summarize how CPT can be adapted for unique cultural or ability considerations.

Course Bibliography

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.

Asamsama, H. O., Dickstein, B. D., & Chard, K. M. (2015). Do scores on the Beck Depression Inventory–II predict outcome in cognitive processing therapy? Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, 7, 437–441.

Asmundson, G. J., Thorisdottir, A. S., Roden-Foreman, J. W., Baird, S. O., Witcraft, S. W., Stein, A. T., et al. (2018): A meta-analytic review of cognitive processing therapy for adults with posttraumatic stress disorder, Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, DOI: 10.1080/16506073.2018.1522371

Bass, J. K., Annan, J., McIvor Murray, S., Kaysen, D., Griffiths, S., Cetinoglu, T., . . . Bolton, P. A. (2013). Controlled trial of psychotherapy for Congolese survivors of sexual violence. New England Journal of Medicine, 368(23), 2182–2191.

Bishop, W., & Fish, J. M. (1999). Questions as interventions: Perceptions of Socratic, solution focused, and diagnostic questioning styles. Journal of Rational-Emotive and CognitiveBehavior Therapy, 12(2), 115–140.

Bryan, C. J., Clemans, T. A., Hernandez, A. M., Mintz, J., Peterson, A. L., Yarvis, J. S., . . . STRONG STAR Consortium. (2016). Evaluating potential iatrogenic suicide risk in trauma-focused group cognitive behavioral therapy for the treatment of PTSD in active duty military personnel. Depression and Anxiety, 33(6), 549–557.

Bryant, R. A., Mastrodomenico, J., Felmingham, K. L., Hopwood, S., Kenny, L., Kandris, E., Cahill, C., & Creamer, M. (2008). Treatment of acute stress disorder: A randomized controlled trial. Archives of General Psychiatry, 65, 659–667.

Butollo, W., Karl, R., König, J., & Rosner, R. (2015). A randomized controlled clinical trial of dialogical exposure therapy vs. cognitive processing therapy for adult outpatients suffering from PTSD after type I trauma in adulthood. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 85, 16–26.

Chard, K. M. (2005). An evaluation of cognitive processing therapy for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder related to childhood sexual abuse. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 73(5), 965–971.

Chard, K. M., Ricksecker, E. G., Healy, E. T., Karlin, B. E., & Resick, P. A. (2012). Dissemination and experience with cognitive processing therapy. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 49(5), 667–678.

Chard, K. M., Schumm, J. A., Owens, G. P., & Cottingham, S. M. (2010). A comparison of OEF and OIF veterans and Vietnam veterans receiving cognitive processing therapy. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 23(1), 25–32.

Chard, K. M., Schuster, J. L., & Resick, P. A. (2012). Cognitive processing therapy. In J. G. Beck & D. M. Sloan (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of traumatic stress disorders (pp. 439– 448). New York: Oxford University Press.

Dondanville, K. A., Blankenship, A. E., Molino, A., Resick, P. A., Wachen, J. S., Mintz, J., . . . STRONG STAR Consortium. (2016). Qualitative examination of cognitive change during PTSD treatment for active duty service members. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 79, 1–6.

Foa, E. B., Cashman, L., Jaycox, L., & Perry, K. (1997). The validation of a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder: The Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale. Psychological Assessment, 9(4), 445–451.

Foa, E. B., & Kozak, M. J. (1986). Emotional processing of fear: Exposure to corrective information. Psychological Bulletin, 99, 2–35.

Foa, E. B., Rothbaum, B., Riggs, D., & Murdock, T. (1991). Treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in rape victims: A comparison between cognitive-behavioral procedures and counseling. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 59(5), 715–723.

Foa, E. B., Zoellner, L. A., & Feeny, N. C. (2006). An evaluation of three brief programs for facilitating recovery after assault. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 19, 29–43.

Forbes, D., Lloyd, D., Nixon, R. D., Elliott, P., Varker, T., Perry, D., . . . Creamer, M. (2012). A multisite randomized controlled effectiveness trial of cognitive processing therapy for military-related posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 26(3), 442– 452.

Gallagher, M., & Resick, P. A. (2012). Mechanisms of change in cognitive processing therapy and prolonged exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder: Preliminary evidence for the differential effects of hopelessness and habituation. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 36(6), 750–755.

Galovski, T. E., Blain, L. M., Mott, J. M., Elwood, L., & Houle, T. (2012). Manualized therapy for PTSD: Flexing the structure of cognitive processing therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 80, 968–981.

Galovski, T. E., Sobel, A., Phipps, K., & Resick, P. A. (2005). Trauma recovery: Beyond the treatment of symptoms of PTSD and other Axis I psychopathology. In T. A. Corales (Ed.), Trends in posttraumatic stress disorder research (pp. 207–227). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science.

Gradus, J. L., Suvak, M. K., Wisco, B. E., Marx, B. P., & Resick, P. A. (2013). Treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder reduces suicidal ideation. Depression and Anxiety, 30, 1046–1053.

Haagen, J. F. G., Smid, G. E., Knipscheer, J. W., & Kleber, R. J. (2015). The efficacy of recommended treatments for veterans with PTSD: A metaregression analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 40, 184–194.

Kaysen, D., Lostutter, T. W., & Goines, M. A. (2005). Cognitive processing therapy for acute stress disorder resulting from an anti-gay assault. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 12(3), 278–289.

Kaysen, D., Schumm, J., Petersen, E. R., Seim, R. W., Bedard-Gilligan, M., & Chard, K. (2014). Cognitive processing therapy for veterans with comorbid PTSD and alcohol use disorders. Addictive Behaviors, 39(2), 420–427.

Kessler, R. C., Sonnega, A., Bromet, E., Hughes, M., & Nelson, C. B. (1995). Posttraumatic stress disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey. Archives of General Psychiatry, 52, 1048–1060.

Kroenke, K., Spitzer, R. L., & Williams, J. B. (2001). The PHQ-9: Validity of a brief depression severity measure. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 16, 606–613.

Foa, E. B., Cashman, L., Jaycox, L., & Perry, K. (1997). The validation of a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder: The Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale. Psychological Assessment, 9(4), 445–451.

Lester, K., Artz, C., Resick, P. A., & Young-Xu, Y. (2010). Impact of race on early treatment termination and outcomes in posttraumatic stress disorder treatment. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 78(4), 480–489.

Lloyd, D., Couineau, A.-L., Hawkins, K., Kartal, D., Nixon, R. D. V., & Forbes, D. P. (2015). Preliminary outcomes of implementing cognitive processing therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder across a national veterans’ treatment service. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 76(11), e1405–e1409.

Maieritsch, K. P., Smith, T. L., Hessinger, J. D., Ahearn, E. P., Eickhoff, J. C., & Zhao, Q. (2016). Randomized controlled equivalence trial comparing videoconference and in person delivery of cognitive processing therapy for PTSD. Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 22(4), 238–243.

Marques, L., Eustis, E. H., Dixon, L., Valentine, S. E., Borba, C. P. C., Simon, N., . . . WiltseyStirman, S. (2016). Delivering cognitive processing therapy in a community health setting: 296 References The Influence of Latino culture and community violence on posttraumatic cognitions. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 8(1), 98–106.

Monson, C. M., Schnurr, P. P., Resick, P. A., Friedman, M. J., Young-Xu, Y., & Stevens, S. P. (2006). Cognitive processing therapy for veterans with military-related posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74(5), 898–907.

Morland, L. A., Hynes, A. K., Mackintosh, M., Resick, P. A., & Chard, K. M. (2011). Group cognitive processing therapy delivered to veterans via telehealth: A pilot cohort. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 24(4), 465–469.

Morland, L. A., Mackintosh, M. A., Rosen, C. S., Willis, E., Resick, P. A., Chard, K. M., & Frueh, B. C. (2015). Telemedicine versus in-person delivery of cognitive processing therapy for women with posttraumatic stress disorder: A randomized noninferiority trial. Depression and Anxiety, 32(11), 811–820.

Nixon, R. D. (2012). Cognitive processing therapy versus supportive counseling for acute stress disorder following assault: A randomized pilot trial. Behavior Therapy, 43(4), 825–836.

Owens, G. P., Pike, J. L., & Chard, K. M. (2001). Treatment effects of cognitive processing therapy on cognitive distortions of female child sexual abuse survivors. Behavior Therapy, 32, 413–424.

Price, J. L., MacDonald, H. Z., Adair, K. C., Koerner, N., & Monson, C. M. (2016). Changing beliefs about trauma: A qualitative study of cognitive processing therapy. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 44(2), 156–167.

Resick, P. A., Bovin, M. J., Calloway, A. L., Dick, A., King, M. W., Mitchell, K. S., . . . Wolf, E. J. (2012). A critical evaluation of the complex PTSD literature: Implications for DSM-5. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 25, 241–251.

Resick, P. A., Monson, C. M., & Chard, K. M. (2016). Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD: A Comprehensive Manual. New York, NJ: Guilford Press.

Resick, P. A., Galovski, T. E., Uhlmansiek, M. O., Scher, C. D., Clum, G., & Young-Xu, Y. (2008). A randomized clinical trial to dismantle components of cognitive processing therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in female victims of interpersonal violence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76(2), 243–258.

Resick, P. A., Jordan, C. G., Girelli, S. A., Hutter, C. K., & Marhoeder-Dvorak, S. (1988). A comparative outcome study of group behavior therapy for sexual assault victims. Behavior Therapy, 19, 385–401.

Resick, P. A., Monson, C. M., & Chard, K. M. (2007). Cognitive processing therapy, veteran/ military version: Therapist’s manual. Washington, DC: Department of Veterans Affairs. (Revised in 2008, 2010, 2014).

Resick, P. A., Nishith, P., Weaver, T. L., Astin, M. C., & Feuer, C. A. (2002). A comparison of cognitive processing therapy, prolonged exposure and a waiting condition for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in female rape victims. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(4), 867–879.

Resick, P. A., Wachen, J. S., Mintz, J., Young-McCaughan, S., Roache, J. D., Borah, A. M., . . . Peterson, A. L. (2015). A randomized clinical trial of group cognitive processing therapy compared with group present-centered therapy for PTSD among active duty military personnel. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 83(6), 1058–1068.

Resick, P. A., Williams, L. F., Suvak, M. K., Monson, C. M., & Gradus, J. L. (2012). Long-term outcomes of cognitive-behavioral treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder among female rape survivors. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 80(2), 201–210.

Schnurr, P. P., Friedman, M. J., Engel, C. C., Foa, E. B., Shea, T., Chow, B. K., . . . Bernardy, N. (2007). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in women: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Medical Association, 297, 820–830.

Schulz, P. M., Huber, L. C., & Resick, P. A. (2006). Practical adaptations of cognitive processing therapy with Bosnian refugees: Implications for adapting practice to a multicultural clientele. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 13(4), 310–321.

Shnaider, P., Vorrstenbosch, V., Macdonald, A., Wells, S. Y., Monson, C. M., & Resick, P. A. (2014). Associations between functioning and PTSD symptom clusters in a dismantling trial of cognitive processing therapy in female interpersonal violence survivors. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27, 526–534.

Suris, A., Link-Malcolm, J., Chard, K., Ahn, C., & North, C. (2013). A randomized clinical trial of cognitive processing therapy for veterans with PTSD related to military sexual trauma. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 26(1), 28–37.

Wachen, J. S., Dondanville, K. A., Pruiksma, K. A., Molino, A., Carson, C. S., Blankenship, A. E., . . . Resick, P. A. (2016). Implementing cognitive processing therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder with active duty U.S. military personnel: Special considerations and case examples. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 23(2), 133–147.

Walter, K. H., Dickstein, B. D., Barnes, S. M., & Chard, K. M. (2014). Comparing effectiveness of CPT to CPT-C among U.S. veterans in an interdisciplinary residential PTSD/TBI treatment program. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 27, 438–445.

Watts, B. V., Schnurr, P. P., Mayo, L., Young-Xu, Y., Weeks, W. B., & Friedman, M. J. (2013). Meta-analysis of the efficacy of treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 74, 541–550.

Weathers, F. W., Litz, B. T., Keane, T. M., Palmieri, P. A., Marx, B. P., & Schnurr, P. P. (2013). The PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Available from the National Center for PTSD at www.ptsd.va.gov

Approvals

Cognitive Behavior Institute, #1771, is approved as an ACE provider to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Regulatory boards are the final authority on courses accepted for continuing education credit. ACE provider approval period: 06/30/2022-06/30/2025. Social workers completing this course receive 14 clinical continuing education credits.

Cognitive Behavior Institute, LLC is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Psychology as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychologists #PSY-0098 and the State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0646 and the State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed mental health counselors #MHC-0216.

Cognitive Behavior Institute has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 7117. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Cognitive Behavior Institute is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

Cognitive Behavior Institute is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Cognitive Behavior Institute maintains responsibility for content of this program. Social workers, marriage and family therapists, and professional counselors in Pennsylvania can receive continuing education from providers approved by the American Psychological Association. Since CBI is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education, licensed social workers, licensed marriage and family therapists, and licensed professional counselors in Pennsylvania will be able to fulfill their continuing education requirements by attending CBI continuing education programs. For professionals outside the state of Pennsylvania, you must confirm with your specific State Board that APA approved CE’s are accepted towards your licensure requirements. The Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB) has a process for approving individual programs or providers for continuing education through their Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. ACE approved providers and individual courses approved by ASWB are not accepted by every state and regulatory board for continuing education credits for social workers. Every US state other than New York accepts ACE approval for social workers in some capacity: New Jersey only accepts individually approved courses for social workers, rather than courses from approved providers. The West Virginia board requires board approval for live courses, but accepts ASWB ACE approval for other courses for social workers. For more information, please see https://www.aswb.org/ace/ace-jurisdiction-map/. Whether or not boards accept ASWB ACE approved continuing education for other professionals such as licensed professional counselors or licensed marriage and family therapists varies by jurisdiction. To determine if a course can be accepted by your licensing board, please review your board’s regulations or contact them. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit.

Accommodation Information: Our webinars are available to anyone who is able to access the internet. For those who are vision impaired graphs and videos are described verbally. We also read all of the questions and comments that are asked of our speakers. All questions and comments are made via the chat function. For those that require it, please contact us at info@cbicenterforeducation.com for more information on and/or to request closed-captioning.

TICKETS TO THIS WEBINAR ARE NON-REFUNDABLE/NON-TRANSFERABLE. ALL SALES ARE FINAL. REFUNDS WILL NOT BE ISSUED FOR ANY REASON OTHER THAN THE EVENT’S CANCELLATION BY CBI

 

Course Schedule

Course Date Course Start Time Course End Time Timezone
05/01/2023 9:00AM 5:00PM EST
05/02/2023 9:00AM 5:00PM EST

Course Agenda

Course Event Day or Date Course Agenda Time Block Course Content Covered
Day 1 9:00AM-9:20AM Introductions, disclosures, course overview
Day 1 9:20AM-12:00PM Overview of CPT
  • Define Cognitive Processing Therapy
  • Describe diagnosis of PTSD and illustrate criteria necessary for diagnosis
  • Summarize evidence-base for CPT
  • Describe and summarize how existing evidence and literature have informed CPT protocol
  • Present cognitive theory of PTSD
  • Question and Answer period
Day 1 10:30AM-10:45AM 15 minute morning break
Day 1 12:00PM-12:30PM break for lunch
Day 1 12:30PM-2:00PM Present overview of the standard 12 session protocol for CPT
Day 1 2:30PM-2:45PM 15 minute break
Day 1 2:00PM-4:00PM Introduce rationale for CPT, core cognitive and emotional concepts
Day 1 4:00PM-5:00PM Introduce and describe stuck points. Small Group Exercise: Is it a Stuck Point?
Day 2 9:00AM-10:00AM Introduce Impact Statement exercise and practice identifying stuck points
Day 2 10:00AM-12:00PM Describe and elaborate on cognitive therapy methods used in CPT (from ABC worksheets up to Challenge Beliefs Worksheets)
  • Question and Answer period
Day 2 10:30-AM10:44AM 15 minute break
Day 2 12:00PM-12:30PM break for lunch
Day 2 12:30PM-1:30PM Introduce trauma account and review goals and examples
Day 2 1:30PM-4:00PM Present the 5 theme modules of CPT and demonstrate the associated exercises
Day 2 2:30PM-2:45PM 15 minute break
Day 2 4:00PM-5:00PM Modifications and Multicultural Applications and wrap up
  • Final Question and Answer period

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions about Zoom and Webinars

What platform will be used for the webinar? CBI Center for Education has invested in Zoom for Webinars. You do not need a Zoom account to join the webinar and you can join from your computer or mobile device. As an attendee, the presenter will not be able to see your video or hear you unless they give you special permission during the webinar.

What time will the webinar begin and in what time zone? Please see the event page on https://www.cbicenterforeducation.com/ for information about the webinar, such as the start time. In addition, when registrants receive the email for the event, the date and time of the event is included.

When will I receive the link to attend the webinar? After you’ve signed up for the event through our website, you will receive an automated email from Blue Sky. At the bottom of this email is a blue button labeled “Join” that you can click on the day of the event. Or log in directly to your Blue Sky account and join from there.

Why can’t I get into the webinar? Once you have joined the webinar, you might see a message that states that the webinar has not yet started. The webinar will start once the presenter has joined and clicks “start the meeting.” We hope this happens on time, but it may be several minutes late. Please be patient while you are waiting for the webinar to start.

lined internet or being physically located close to your router. Technical support will not be provided by CBI for any connection issues on the day of the training. CBI will not issue refunds due to technical issues experienced by participants. Our presenters are connected to hard-lined business-grade internet when presenting.

What happens if my internet briefly freezes? If you become disconnected during the event, log back on immediately. A brief interruption of connectivity will not impact your eligibility for a CE certificate.

Will there be a recording? No, there will not be a recording or replay.

Will you know that I am logged in and active in the webinar? Yes, Zoom’s platform monitors the attendance and activity of the attendees. Additionally, there will be a chat feature and various forms of participation monitored throughout the training.

Will I have to show my face on camera? Zoom’s webinar platform does not capture participants on video unless specifically requested during the meeting by the host. Instead, participants will view the presenter and the presenter's slides on their screen.

Is there Audio? Yes, the webinar will have sound. Please test that your device’s sound is working prior to the event. A good way to do this is to go to YouTube and play a
video.

Questions about the Event

Will I receive the presenter's slides? It is up to each presenter if they wish to share their slides. If slides are being shared, they will be uploaded as a document within the course in Blue Sky and can be downloaded and printed as necessary. We are unable to respond to emails asking for the slides ahead of the presentation.
 

Questions about the Survey

When will I receive my course evaluation survey? Following the completion of the event, the survey will be unlocked and located within the course.

You must complete the survey within 14 calendar days following the event if you would like to receive a CE certificate.

We are unable to respond to emails from participants asking for confirmation that their course completion survey was received. If you clicked the SUBMIT button your survey was received.

Do I need to fill out the course evaluation survey if I don’t want a CE certificate? If you do not wish to receive a CE certificate, you do not need to complete this survey. The CE certificate is the only type of certificate that will be issued.
 

Questions about Continuing Education & Certificates

What is the criteria for receiving CE? If you attend the whole webinar and complete the course evaluation survey, we will issue you the CE that you are eligible for.

How many suicide and ethics CE's will be issued? Please see the event page on https://www.cbicenterforeducation.com/for information about the training, including how much continuing education is offered and what type.

Will these CE's count toward my individual state licensure or another credential that I currently hold? It is the responsibility of the licensee to determine if trainings are acceptable as continuing education to their state’s licensure board or other credentialing body. Some of our trainings are individually approved for continuing education, such as through the Association of Social Work Boards individual course ACE Program. In addition, CBI is an approved provider of continuing education through the American Psychological Association CESA program and is an approved provider of continuing education to counselors, social workers, and psychologists in the state of New York. Many boards accept trainings that are individual approved or are offered by approved providers for continuing education. Please see the event page for the training you are interested in on our website https://www.cbicenterforeducation.com/for approvals that apply for each specific training.

Will you issue partial CE credits? No, we do not issue partial CE credits and therefore if you do not attend the training in its entirety, you will not be receiving a CE certificate. This is an APA and ASWB ACE requirement and is non-negotiable. Please refrain from emailing us explaining why you were unable to login to the event on time (this includes mixing up time zones and technical difficulties).

When will I receive my CE certificate? Upon completion of the event and survey, your certificate will immediately be available.

How will I receive my CE certificate? Your CE certificate will be available through your Blue Sky account and will also be directly sent to your email associated with your Blue Sky account. It will automatically be accessible to you once all previous criteria have been met.

I filled out the wrong email address or misspelled my name on my account registration. How do I get a new certificate? In the registration, it asks for the participant to fill out
their name, licensure, and license number. These fields automatically populate within our certificates. PLEASE NOTE: Any requested changes to the email entered after
registration or after the survey is complete will require a $5 processing fee. Additional changes to the produced CE certificate based off of information provided by the attendee will also require a $5 processing fee. CBI Center of Education is extremely lean administratively and utilizes technology to streamline our events in order to keep our trainings free to low cost. When we receive manual requests post registration, additional staff is needed to assist with these manual requests, thus the reason for the
change fees. Please reach out to info@cbicenterforeducation.com

Questions about Accommodation

How can I access accommodations for my disability? Our webinars are available to anyone who is able to access the internet. For those who are vision impaired graphs
and videos are described verbally. We also read all of the questions and comments that are asked of our speakers. All questions and comments are made via the chat function.

For those that require it, please contact us at info@cbicenterforeducation.com for more information on and/or to request closed-captioning.
 

Additional Questions

I have a question that isn’t in the Q&A. If you have any additional questions or concerns, please email us at info@cbicenterforeducation.com.

Click here to access our Refund, Cancellation and Grievance Policies.

Our CE Affiliates

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